The first law of thermodynamics (which states that energy is conserved) does not specify the direction in which thermodynamic processes in n

Question

The first law of thermodynamics (which states that energy is conserved) does not specify the direction in which thermodynamic processes in nature can spontaneously occur.

a. True
b. False

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Đan Thu 1 year 2021-08-09T00:39:22+00:00 1 Answers 23 views 0

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    2021-08-09T00:41:08+00:00

    Answer:

    a. True

    Explanation:

    The law of conservation of Energy states that energy cannot be destroyed but can only be converted or transformed from one form to another. Therefore, the sum of the initial kinetic energy and potential energy is equal to the sum of the final kinetic energy and potential energy.

    Mathematically, it is given by the formula;

    Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf …….equation 1

    Where;

    Ki and Kf are the initial and final kinetic energy respectively.

    Ui and Uf are the initial and final potential energy respectively.

    The First Law of Thermodynamics is another way to describe the Law of Conservation of Energy. Typically, the First Law of Thermodynamics states that the change of internal energy of a system is equal to the sum of external work and heat spent on the system.

    Mathematically, the First Law of Thermodynamics is given by the formula;

    ΔU = Q − W

    Where;

    ΔU represents the change in internal energy of a system.

    Q represents the net heat transfer in and out of the system.

    W represents the sum of work (net work) done on or by the system.

    Hence, the direction in which any thermodynamic process in nature can spontaneously occur isn’t stated by the First Law of Thermodynamics.

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