A scientist told his student assistants that he had sorted groups of mice by their intelligence and asked the assistants to assess the group

Question

A scientist told his student assistants that he had sorted groups of mice by their intelligence and asked the assistants to assess the groups’ maze-solving abilities. The scientist had not actually sorted the mice by intelligence. The students rated the “highest intelligence” group of mice as the best maze solvers and the “lowest intelligence” group as the worst maze solvers. What was the scientist trying to demonstrate by doing this experiment?
Experimental subjects should never be put into groups.
Mice should not be judged by their intelligence.
Higher intelligence mice are better maze solvers.
People can introduce their own biases into an experiment.

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Doris 5 months 2021-08-09T07:42:23+00:00 1 Answers 11 views 0

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    2021-08-09T07:44:03+00:00

    Answer: People can introduce their own biases into an experiment.

    Explanation:

    The scientist had not actually sorted the mice in terms of intelligence which means that the rats in all the groups possessed the same intelligence on average yet the students after assessment, still corroborated his false narrative by stating that the more intelligent mice were better at solving mazes.

    This means that somehow, they must have altered the assessment to fit the narrative of the scientist and they might have done this either consciously or unconsciously. This therefore shows that people will usually introduce their own biases into an experiment in order for it to turn out a certain way.

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